Antipasto vs Charcuterie

Antipasto vs Charcuterie

The next time you plan dinner, don’t forget the appetizers.  Should you serve Antipasto vs Charcuterie.  Aren’t they the same thing?  Not exactly, let us help explain.

Charcuterie  “shar-coo-ta-ree,” — French  —  A platter of good-quality cooked and dry-cured meats, sausages and pâté with various garnishes like bread, Olives, Nuts, Dried Fruit, Crackers or baguette bread, Jelly or jam.

Or is it called

Antipasto “an-tee-paa-stow” — Italian  —  A platter of meats, cheeses, raw or cooked vegetables, olives and bread. The antipasto platter is pretty much the same as a charcuterie platter. Both involve dry, cured meats and garnishes.

The main difference between the two, aside from their cultural background, is that the charcuterie does not normally have cheese.  Many chefs will add cheese in order to provide yet more variety.

In the US, there are many misconceptions about antipasti, beginning with the meaning of the word itself. Americans often believe antipasto means a dish served before a pasta course. Though, in fact, this may sometimes be the case, it isn’t the real meaning of the term. Literally, the word “antipasto” is derived from the Latin root “anti” meaning “before” and “pastus,” which means “meal.”  Thus, the antipasto course simply refers to the dish that precedes all the others to come.   In Italian tradition, antipasti are selected for color, flavor, texture and how well they complement both each other and the meal to come.

In English, we call it the appetizer course.  For the French, it is the hors d’oeuvre. In Italy, it’s called the antipasto. It can be hot or cold, cooked or raw. Antipasti (plural form) can be served on individual plates, each one artfully designed; or, in bite-size pieces on a plate that is passed around the table; or, presented as an elegant centerpiece from which everyone is served. For the cook, it can be a chance to embellish, dazzle, and have some fun. The antipasto course can be the host’s culinary valentine, a sumptuous invitation to the feast that is to follow.  The presentation of antipasti—the colors, the artful composition, the care taken in its preparation—reminds guests that it is a time for pleasure, relaxation and indulgence.

Our Chef has made many of these displays and they always look a little different each time, depending on how many people it’s serving and whether it’s going out on a full-service event or just a drop-off.

These two are Antipasto Displays, the first one is for Full-Service Event and the second one is for a drop off order

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are Charcuterie Displays, the first one is for a full-service event and the second one is for a drop off order.

Charcuterie

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call Fat Freddy’s Catering and we’ll help you pick all the right appetizers, entrees, sides, etc.

(623) 580-4653

Scroll Up